Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Prayer Group Meeting Talk on Luke 13




Since the end of March, all my prayer group meetings have been online via Zoom. I started a prayer group in April 1994. The prayer groups are dedicated to foster the message of Our Lady of Fatima and Devotion to Divine Mercy.

Currently, the Chinese prayer group is meeting online every Sunday at 7:15 pm (Pacific Time) and the English prayer group meets every Monday at 7 pm (Pacific Time). Our meeting is about one hour 45 minutes with Night Prayer, Rosary (with guided meditations), Talk on Bible & Spiritual Life, Chaplet of Divine Mercy, and Act of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.    

If you are interested to join, please register with me by email at fatheranthonyho@gmail.com I am going to add your email to our email list, and you are going to receive meeting reminders with Zoom link and a weekly review email. 

Below are the audio recordings of our Bible studies on Luke 13. I would like to invite those who were not able to join and those who want to review the talks to listen to the audio recordings of the Bible studies:

In English (recorded on Monday, November 30, 2020):


In Cantonese (recorded on Sunday, November 29, 2020):


Here is the website with audio recordings of Bible studies and Sunday homilies:


Here are some highlights of our Bible study on Luke 13:

The need for repentance
Luke 13:1–5

Every event carries a message from God, and therefore can help us turn back to God“Going over all the stages of history again, we will see that in each era the Lord has given a chance to repent to anyone who wanted to convert to him” (St Clement of Rome, Ad Corinthios, 7, 5).

Wake-up call. Tragedies that occur, whether far away or close to home, can alert us to turn away from sin and destructive behaviors. One of God’s purposes in permitting them is to call us to repentance. “Suffering must serve for conversion.”

Gadenz, P. T. (2018). The Gospel of Luke. (P. S. Williamson & M. Healy, Eds.) (p. 251). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic: A Division of Baker Publishing Group.

“When you meet with suffering, the cross, your thought should be: what is this compared with what I deserve?” (St Josemaría Escrivá, The Way, 690).

Parable of the barren fig tree
Luke 13:6–9

In the other two Synoptics (see Mt 21:18–22; Mk 11:12–25) the barren fig tree symbolizes the temple, which appeared to be functioning properly but was in fact ineffective. 

“There is one case that we should be especially sorry about—that of Christians who could do more and don’t; Christians who could live all the consequences of their vocation as children of God, but refuse to do so through lack of generosity.” (St Josemaría Escrivá, Christ Is Passing By, 147).

Parables of the mustard seed and of the leaven
Luke 13:18–21

Our Lord “with the parable of the mustard seed encourages them to have faith and shows them that the Gospel preaching will spread in spite of everything. The Lord’s disciples were the weakest of men, but nevertheless, because of the great power that was in them, the Gospel has been spread to every part of the world” (St John Chrysostom, In Matthaeum, 46). 

Ver. 19. Our Lord was this mustard-seed, when he was buried in the earth; and He became a tree, when he ascended into heaven; but a tree that overshadowed the whole creation, in the branches of which the birds of heaven rested; that is, the powers of heaven, and all such as by good works have raised themselves from the earth. The apostles are the branches, to repose in whose bosoms we take our flight, borne on the wings of Christian virtue. Let us sow this seed (Christ) in the garden of our hearts, that the grace of good works may flourish, and you may send forth the various perfumes of every virtue. S. Amb.

Haydock, G. L. (1859). Haydock’s Catholic Bible Commentary (Lk 13:19). New York: Edward Dunigan and Brother.

Ver. 21. The flour represents us Christians, who receive the Lord Jesus into the inner parts of our soul, till we are all inflamed with the fire of his heavenly wisdom. S. Ambrose.

Haydock, G. L. (1859). Haydock’s Catholic Bible Commentary (Lk 13:21). New York: Edward Dunigan and Brother.

Mother Teresa said that those who are not called to do great things are called to do small things with great love. After all, salvation came to the world because one young woman accepted one Child into her life. Small acts of kindness, obedience, and faithful ministry can have extraordinary ripple effects.

Ponessa, J. L., & Manhardt, L. W. (2015). The Gospel of Luke (p. 115). Steubenville, OH: Emmaus Road Publishing.

Pairing of Men and Women in Luke

Luke frequently pairs passages involving male and female characters. For example, the angel appears to Zechariah and Mary (1:11–20, 26–38); Simeon and Anna encounter Jesus in the temple (2:25–38); Jesus rebukes the demon possessing a man and the fever afflicting Peter’s mother-in-law (4:33–39); he heals the centurion’s dying slave and raises the widow’s dead son (7:2–15); and Simon of Cyrene and the women of Jerusalem meet Jesus on his way to Calvary (23:26–31). Such pairings also occur in Jesus’ teaching—for example, the widow of Zarephath and Naaman the Syrian (4:26–27); the queen of the south and the men of Nineveh (11:31–32); the man who plants a mustard seed and the woman who mixes leaven (13:18–21); and the man who finds the lost sheep and the woman the lost coin (15:4–10). A passage can sometimes be paired with more than one passage; for example, the raising of the widow’s son also relates to the raising of Jairus’s daughter (8:49–56). Thus, paired passages need not be adjacent—for example, the twelve apostles (6:13–16) and the women disciples (8:2–3).

The pairings are not simply a stylistic feature but have a theological purpose. They show that, amid human diversity, God’s salvation in Jesus overcomes division: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free person, there is not male and female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s descendant” (Gal 3:28–29 [emphasis added]). Indeed, the crippled woman healed on a sabbath is a “daughter of Abraham” (Luke 13:16[emphasis added]) and Zacchaeus is a “son of Abraham” (19:9 NRSV [emphasis added]). The pairings also show how Jesus brings fulfillment to Old Testament prophecies involving God’s sons and daughters (e.g., Isa 43:6; 49:22; 60:4), as Peter explains on the day of Pentecost: “Your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, … / even on my male servants and female servants / in those days I will pour out my Spirit” (Acts 2:17–18 ESV, citing Joel 3:1–2). Moreover, “just as the fall was both theirs, so redemption was both theirs.”c Jesus thus brings healing to both “Man” (Luke 5:20 RSV) and “Woman” (13:12).

Gadenz, P. T. (2018). The Gospel of Luke. (P. S. Williamson & M. Healy, Eds.) (p. 255). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic: A Division of Baker Publishing Group.


The narrow gate
Luke 13:22–30

Salvation does not depend on race (v. 26: “We ate and drank in your presence”: Jews would not eat with Gentiles); it is available to those who struggle to obtain it (v. 27), eschewing sin
This passage puts us on our guard against the danger of having a false sense of security. To belong to the people of God, or to have known Christ and heard him teach, is no guarantee of the reward of heaven. God will judge us on what we actually do—on our response to grace.

Jesus’ reply to Herod
Luke 13:31–35

“Jesus freely accepted his Passion and death: ‘No one takes [my life] from me, but I lay it down of my own accord’ (
Jn 10:18). Hence the sovereign freedom of God’s Son as he went out to his death” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 609). Jesus is aware, moreover, that the failure of his mission to the Jews is only a temporary one, for the time will come when they will acknowledge him as the Messiah (v. 35).

The Navarre Bible: New Testament. (2008). Dublin; New York: Four Courts Press; Scepter Publishers.

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Prayer Group Meeting Talk on Luke 12

 




"Jesus, Mary, I love You! Save souls!"

Since the end of March, all my prayer group meetings have been online via Zoom. I started a prayer group in April 1994. The prayer groups are dedicated to foster the message of Our Lady of Fatima and Devotion to Divine Mercy.

Currently, the Chinese prayer group is meeting online every Sunday at 7:15 pm (Pacific Time) and the English prayer group meets every Monday at 7 pm (Pacific Time). Our meeting is about one hour 45 minutes with Night Prayer, Rosary (with guided meditations), Talk on Bible & Spiritual Life, Chaplet of Divine Mercy, and Act of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.    

If you are interested to join, please register with me by email at fatheranthonyho@gmail.com I am going to add your email to our email list, and you are going to receive meeting reminders with Zoom link and a weekly review email. 


Below are the audio recordings of our Bible studies on Luke 12. I would like to invite those who were not able to join and those who want to review the talks to listen to the audio recordings of the Bible studies:

In English (recorded on Monday, November 23, 2020):


In Cantonese (recorded on Sunday, November 22, 2020):


Here is the website with audio recordings of Bible studies and Sunday homilies:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/16sPtJfEYC2zNX39TmxZkcnTO7EfA3rWj

Here are some highlights of our Bible study on Luke 12:


Parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13–21):

“A person who lives as if he were to die every day—given that our life is uncertain by definition—will not sin, for good fear extinguishes most of the disorder of our appetites; whereas he who thinks he has a long life ahead of him will easily let himself be dominated by pleasures” (St Athanasius, Vita Antonii).


Trust in God’s fatherly providence (Luke 12:22–34):

“All the faithful are invited and obliged to holiness and the perfection of their own state of life. Accordingly let all of them see that they direct their affections rightly, lest they be hindered in their pursuit of perfect love by the use of worldly things and by an adherence to riches which is contrary to the spirit of evangelical poverty” (Vatican II, Lumen gentium, 42).    
 

The need for vigilance; the parable of the steward (Luke 12:35–48):

In his appeal for vigilance here, Jesus uses two metaphors—being dressed for the occasion, and having one’s lamp always lit (v. 35). The Jews tucked their flowing garments inside a belt when they had to do certain kinds of work or go on a journey, etc., so having one’s “loins girded” means showing that one is on the alert and prepared (cf. Jer 1:17; Eph 6:14; 1 Pet 1:13). Similarly, a lamp is kept burning if one is on guard duty or waiting for someone to arrive. Our Lord then goes on to describe how we should be on the lookout, certain that he is on his way—like a servant waiting for his master, or a householder protecting himself against a thief: servant and householder both know that the other will come and that their future depends on what will happen when he arrives. Verse 37 seems shocking in the context of life in Jesus’ time: it is difficult to believe that a master would prepare a meal for his servants simply because they had waited up to greet him. But that is what the Lord does for his faithful servants: he girds himself and renders them service (see Jn 13:1–20).

 The Navarre Bible: New Testament. (2008). (pp. 304–305). Dublin; New York: Four Courts Press; Scepter Publishers.


The signs of the times (Luke 12:54–59): 

In the complaint he makes here, Jesus plays on two meanings of the word “time”—the one having connexions with the weather, and the other having to do with stages in salvation history. People seemed to be using two kinds of reasoning: they apply logic to understand earthly things, but no logic at all in their judgments of him. The signs he has given them (miracles, his life and his teaching) should be enough to convince them that he is the Messiah. However, they have failed to understand the signs and they have misunderstood him. It was not only many of Jesus’ contemporaries who behaved like this. It happens today as well, when people ignore God’s signs or his voice when he speaks to their conscience: “Those who wilfully try to drive God from their heart and to avoid all questions about religion, not following the biddings of their conscience, are not free from blame” (Vatican II, Gaudium et spes, 19).

 The Navarre Bible: New Testament. (2008). (p. 306). Dublin; New York: Four Courts Press; Scepter Publishers.


Reflection and Application (Luke 12:49):

On fire with zeal. Inspired by Jesus’ words about his mission (12:49), St. Ignatius of Loyola told departing missionaries like St. Francis Xavier: “Go, set the world on fire!” Zeal for the mission of spreading the gospel is a hallmark of saints.

Gadenz, P. T. (2018). The Gospel of Luke. (P. S. Williamson & M. Healy, Eds.) (p. 248). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic: A Division of Baker Publishing Group.



A beautiful little prayer I recommended at the English prayer meeting to foster zeal: "Jesus, Mary, I love You! Save souls!”

I wrote an article about this in 2018:

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Prayer Group Meeting Talk on Luke 11

 


St. Joseph of Cupertino constantly urged people to pray: "Pray! Pray! If you are troubled with dryness or distractions, just say an Our Father. Then you make both vocal and mental prayer."


Since the end of March, all my prayer group meetings have been online via Zoom. I started a prayer group in April 1994. The prayer groups are dedicated to foster the message of Our Lady of Fatima and Devotion to Divine Mercy.

Currently, the Chinese prayer group is meeting online every Sunday at 7:15 pm (Pacific Time) and the English prayer group meets every Monday at 7 pm (Pacific Time). Our meeting is about one hour 45 minutes with Night Prayer, Rosary (with guided meditations), Talk on Bible & Spiritual Life, Chaplet of Divine Mercy, and Act of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.    

If you are interested to join, please register with me by email at fatheranthonyho@gmail.com I am going to add your email to our email list, and you are going to receive meeting reminders with Zoom link and a weekly review email. 

Below are the audio recordings of our Bible studies on Luke 11. I would like to invite those who were not able to join and those who want to review the talks to listen to the audio recordings of the Bible studies:

In English (recorded on Monday, November 16, 2020):


In Cantonese (recorded on Sunday, November 15, 2020):


Here is the website with audio recordings of Bible studies and Sunday homilies:


Here are some highlights of our Bible study on Luke 11:

Luke 11:1–4 The Our Father 

“If you study all the prayers in Holy Scripture, you will find nothing that is not contained in the Lord’s Prayer. In your prayer, you can put the petitions it contains into different words, but you should not change the petitions themselves to ask for different things. […] This prayer is, to my mind, an explanation of what prayer should be, what should be asked for in prayer. This is not my teaching; it is what we have all been taught by the one who deigned to be our Master” (St Augustine, Ad Probam, 12–13). 

11:2. “Hallowed be thy name”: in this first petition of the Our Father “we pray that God may be known, loved, honoured and served by everyone and by ourselves in particular.” This means that we want “unbelievers to come to a knowledge of the true God, heretics to recognize their errors, schismatics to return to the unity of the Church, sinners to be converted and the righteous to persevere in doing good.” By this first petition, our Lord is teaching us that “we must desire God’s glory more than our own interest and advantage”. This hallowing of God’s name is attained “by prayer and good example and by directing all our thoughts, affections and actions towards him” (St Pius X, Catechism, 290–293).

“Thy kingdom come”: “By the Kingdom of God we understand a triple spiritual kingdom—the Kingdom of God in us, which is grace; the Kingdom of God on earth, which is the Catholic Church; and the Kingdom of God in heaven, which is eternal bliss […]. As regards grace, we pray that God reign in us with his sanctifying grace, by which he is pleased to dwell in us as a king in his throne-room, and that he keep us united to him by the virtues of faith, hope and charity, by which he reigns in our intellect, in our heart and in our will […]. As regards the Church, we pray that it extend and spread all over the world for the salvation of men […]. As regards heaven, we pray that one day we be admitted to that eternal bliss for which we have been created, where we will be totally happy” (ibid., 294–297).

11:3. The Tradition of the Church usually interprets the “bread” as not only material bread, since “man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God” (Mt 4:4; Deut 8:3). Here Jesus wants us to ask God for “what we need each day for soul and body […]. For our soul we ask God to sustain our spiritual life, that is, we beg him to give us his grace, of which we are continually in need […]. The life of our soul is sustained mainly by the divine word and by the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar […]. For our bodies we pray for what is needed to maintain us” (St Pius X Catechism, 302–305).

“If the bread we ask God for is ‘our daily bread’, why do you only go to receive it once a year? Receive daily what enriches every day, and live your daily life in such a way as to be worthy to receive it” (St Ambrose, De Sacramentis, 5, 4).

11:4.  “We do not ask to be freed from temptation, for temptation marks the life of man on earth (cf.Job 7:1). […] What we ask for here is that with the help of God we will not give in to temptation, nor yield to temptation out of discouragement. The grace of God is never slow to come to our aid, which should be a comfort and support to us when we feel our own lack of strength” (Roman Catechism, 4, 15, 14).

Luke 11:14–26 The Kingdom of God and the kingdom of Satan 

Jesus’ critics now approach him making a grave charge—that the devil is acting through him. Jesus refutes this, and at the same time gives them a serious warning (cf. the notes on Mt 12:22–37 and Mk 3:22–30). He makes a comparison (vv. 24–26) to show them the danger they are in: thanks to God’s action among them they have seen people freed from the devil, but their obstinate attitude towards Christ gives the evil one new scope to do his worst. Elsewhere in the New Testament (see Heb 6:4–6; 2 Pet 2:20–22) sacred writers express their worry that Christians might find themselves in a similar situation.

On 13th January 1863, a holy soul, (Venerable Father Louis Cestac - founder of the Congregation of the Servants of Mary, who died in 1868), who was accustomed to receiving the generous blessing of the Most Blessed Virgin, was suddenly struck by a ray of divine light:-

The visionary saw a vision of demons swarming over the earth causing inexpressible injury and destruction. At the same time, the Holy Virgin appeared, saying that the time had come to pray to her as Queen of Angels and to ask her to send legions of angels to fight and overthrow the powers of hell.

The soul addressed the Virgin with the following words: "O my Mother you who are so good, could you not send your angels without us having to ask you?"
“No” the Virgin replied, “prayer is a condition established by God himself even to obtain graces.” “Then, Mother”, the visionary asked, “would you teach me how we should pray to you?” And the Holy Virgin dictated this prayer ‘August Queen’ :

August Queen of Heaven and Mistress of the Angels, You who have received from God the power and the mission to crush the head of Satan; We humbly ask you to send the heavenly legions, So that under your command they may:
 pursue the demons, combat them everywhere, crush their bold attacks, and drive them back into the Abyss.
        "Who is like God?"
O good and tender Mother, you will always be our love and our hope. O heavenly Mother, send the holy Angels to defend me and repel far from me the cruel enemy. Holy Angels and Archangels defend and guard us. Amen.

(A printable Prayer Card with this prayer is available for you to download - http://www.marysheel.org/two-prayers/5-august-queen-prayer.html
This is a literal translation of the original French text of the prayer dictated by Our Lady to a soul on 13 January 1863. The prayer received the Imprimatur from the local Bishop; was recommended to the faithful by Pope Pius IX; and later indulgenced by Pope Leo XIII and also by Pope Pius X.

I recommend saying this prayer in the morning along with St. Michael Prayer and Guadian Angel Prayer.

Luke 11:27–28 Responding to the word of God 

St. Joseph of Cupertino is the patron saint for writing exams.

All unschooled, Joseph remained unable to explain a single text of the bible except verse 27 of Luke, Chapter 11: As Jesus said this, a woman raised her voice in the crowd saying, “Blessed is the mother who bore you into it, and whose breasts have fed you!”
On January 3, 1627, Bishop Jerome of Franchis presided over an oral examination required for entrance exam to the minor orders. In choosing a theme, the bishop opened the Bible at random and landed precisely upon Luke 11:27. To his surprise, Joseph made a brilliant commentary on the verse and was permitted to advance.

A year later, Joseph – by then a deacon – asked to be received into the priesthood. The first applications presented for review by Bishop de Castro were so impressive that the bishop decided the whole class must be similarly gifted, and admitted all of the candidates to ordination. Thus Joseph was ordained in 1628, having been exempted from exams he probably could not have passed.

From then on his life was one long succession of ecstasies, miracles of healing, and supernatural events on a scale not paralleled in the authenticated life of any other saint. He is particularly famous for his levitations. He is the patron saint of air travelers, pilots and learning disabled.

The life of St. Joseph of Cupertino reminds me of a passage from In Sinu Jesu, the journal of a Benedictine priest during prayer when he was in conservation with Christ:

I would work marvels in every place on earth through the ministry of My priests if they would accept the graces that I hold in reserve for them. I would first purify and sanctify them, and then, by means of their sacred ministry, purify and sanctify a great multitude of souls, so as to make of them an offering of praise and thanksgiving to the glory of My Father. 

Why do My priests refuse the gifts that I would lavish upon them? Many are self-sufficient, relying on their natural abilities and talents, and thinking that these natural gifts are sufficient for the success of their ministry. But their idea of success is not Mine. And the means that they would take are not Mine. And I have no need of their natural abilities and talents. I can do more with one poor priest who, like the Curé of Ars, is humble and utterly united to Me by ceaseless prayer, than I can with a priest who astounds the world with his knowledge and presents himself brilliantly in the sight of men.

When I find a priest who is open to My gifts, I lavish these gifts upon him. Nothing is lacking to the priest who comes before Me in his poverty, and even in his sins, provided that he give Me his poverty and entrust Me with his sins, and expose all his weaknesses to the transforming light of My Eucharistic Face.

Monk, A Benedictine. In Sinu Jesu: When Heart Speaks to Heart--The Journal of a Priest at Prayer (pp. 119-120). Angelico Press. Kindle Edition. 

Luke 11:33–36 The lamp of the body, the light of the soul

A person who has good eyesight sees things clearly; similarly, those who are morally upright and pure of heart are able to see God at work in the world. Christ makes an appeal here; if people repent, they will be able to discern the truth: “Clear sight is the mother of all virtue, and everyone should have this discernment in order to give spiritual guidance to others or to bring order to one’s own life. Human judgment is true and just when it is in line with God’s will; and human intentions are good when they are trained wholly on God. If our sight is clear, our life and each one of our actions will shine; and our sight is clear when we see clearly what must be done and, acting on our good intention, do what must be done without duplicity. No error can come from good judgment, nor can good intentions lead us to lie. The definition of discernment is the combination of good intention with true judgment. All our actions should be guided by the light of clear discernment, bearing in mind always that we work in God’s presence and for his glory” (Baldwin of Canterbury, Tractatus, 6).

At the end of the talk, I shared the story of St. Faustina seeing the Child Jesus and experience a vision concerning a dying man. Christ told her: True greatness is in loving God and in humility. 

I am currently writing a series of weekly articles on the Mysteries of the Holy Rosary in English and Chinese for The BC Catholic newspaper. You can read the articles here:


100 years ago today (November 18, 1920) the Bolshevik regime in Soviet Russia legalized abortion. It was a moment of terrible consequence for Russia and the world. A nun said,  “We are hoping that this anniversary will not pass unnoticed and that it will be an occasion of praying for an end to abortion in the whole world”.  Here is an article on the topic:


Let's pray and make sacrifices for the end of the evil of abortion! 

Thursday, May 31, 2018

12th Anniversary of Priestly Ordination

Yesterday (May 30), I had the joy of celebrating the 12th Anniversary of Priestly Ordination with parishioners and prayer groups members.

We had Holy Hour (Adoration, Night Prayer, English-Cantonese Rosary, Taize hymns, and Benediction). After the Holy Hour, we had pot-luck dinner. During which, there was a presentation, followed by Divine Mercy and Blessing.












Monday, January 22, 2018

A Beautiful Prayer and Reflection of St. Faustina for the Practice of Mercy in Daily Life.

+ O Most Holy Trinity! As many times as I breathe, as many times as my heart beats, as
many times as my blood pulsates through my body, so many thousand times do I want to
glorify Your mercy.

+I want to be completely transformed into Your mercy and to be Your living reflection, O
Lord. May the greatest of all divine attributes, that of Your unfathomable mercy, pass
through my heart and soul to my neighbor.

Help me, O Lord, that my eyes may be merciful, so that I may never suspect or judge
from appearances, but look for what is beautiful in my neighbors‟ souls and come to their
rescue.

Help me, that my ears may be merciful, so that I may give heed to my neighbors‟ needs
and not be indifferent to their pains and moanings.

Help me, O Lord, that my tongue may be merciful, so that I should never speak negatively
of my neighbor, but have a word of comfort and forgiveness for all.

Help me, O Lord, that my hands may be merciful and filled with good deeds, so that I may
do only good to my neighbors and take upon myself the more difficult and toilsome tasks.

Help me, that my feet may be merciful, so that I may hurry to assist my neighbor,
overcoming my own fatigue and weariness. My true rest is in the service of my neighbor.

Help me, O Lord, that my hart may be merciful so that I myself may feel all the sufferings
of my neighbor. I will refuse my heart to no one. I will be sincere even with those who, I
know, will abuse my kindness. And I will lock myself up in the most merciful Heart of
Jesus. I will bear my own suffering in silence. May Your mercy, O Lord, rest upon me.

+ You Yourself command me to exercise the three degrees of mercy. The first: the act of
mercy, of whatever kind. The second: the word of mercy – if I cannot carry out a work of
mercy, I will assist by my words. The third: prayer – if I cannot show mercy by deeds or
words, I can always do so by prayer. My prayer reaches out even there where I cannot
reach out physically.

O my Jesus, transform me into Yourself, for you can do all things.-----Diary of St. Faustina (#163)